Canadian Supreme Court Cites Prof. Inazu’s Book in Collective Bargaining Case

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A short article I wrote that will help redefine your understanding of “the freedom of assembly.”

Professor John Inazu’s scholarship was recently cited in an opinion issued by the Supreme Court of Canada. The case, Mounted Police Association of Ontario v. Canada, centered on constitutional protection for collective bargaining. The decision included a lengthy discussion of the freedom of association, which was a key focus of Inazu’s 2012 book, Liberty’s Refuge: The Forgotten Freedom of Assembly. Continue reading

Field Day: An Explosion of Fun, Motion, and Laughter

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In which I had the opportunity to cover the Law School’s First Annual Field Day.

It was a brisk autumn day in front of Anheuser-Busch Hall, as a collection of more than 20 law students and Dean Nancy Staudt cheerfully aligned themselves on either side of the lawn. As soon as the teams were decided, bodies exploded into motion, dodging, laughing, and sprinting through grass and along cement walkways. The event was Washington University School of Law’s first Field Day; the game, Capture the Flag. Continue reading

Law Student’s Play Premieres at A.E. Hotchner Playwriting Festival

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An article published a few weeks ago reviewing the world premier of Cary Simowitz’s play, Ekphasia, or “The Shadow Girl.”

“As the house lights illuminated the interior of Washington University’s A.E. Hotchner Studio, a young man stepped out onto the stage and found himself awash in a sea of friends, relatives, and other well-wishers. The house was packed, every seat filled, and he could not go more than three paces without a hug, a handshake, or a pat on the back.”

Read the full article here: [link]

Panel Features Prof. Norwood’s Book, Color Matters

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An article published in the Spring of 2014 detailing a panel in which Professor Kimberly Jade Norwood and some of her fellow contributors discussed some of the details of their book Color Matters: Skin Tone Bias and the Myth of a Postracial America.

“In Color Matters, they, along with nine other contributors, examine the phenomenon of colorism, which they define as the preference, even among people of color, for lighter skin. The book also challenges the belief that skin color no longer matters in a postracial America. According to Norwood, colorism is a form a discrimination or preference based on one’s skin tone. The phenomenon leads to a color caste system where the darker one is, the more marginalized personal and socioeconomic outcomes for that person becomes.”

Read the full article here: [link]

Judge Bennett Delivers Lecture on Mass Incarceration

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An article written in the Spring of 2014 on the Hon. Mark Bennett and his latest book, A Holocaust in Slow Motion? America’s Mass Incarceration and the Role of Discretion.

“The title of the book was taken from a line from The House I Live in, an award-winning documentary on the never-ending War on Drugs in which Bennett appeared. In his lecture, Bennett discussed the progression of mass incarceration in the United States since the beginning of the government’s War on Drugs. While the United States may contain only 5 percent of the world’s population, it possesses 25 percent of the world’s incarcerated population. Using a series of charts, Bennett showed that in the last 40 years, the country’s prison population has seen a 500 percent increase, and a 1,950 percent increase in the populations of federal prisons due solely to drug-based offenses.”

Read full article here: [link]

Alumni Profile | Andrew Gray, JD ’07

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An article detailing the rise of one of Washington University Law’s alumni, Andrew Gray, published in the Winter of 2014.

“Before pursing his law degree, Andrew Gray, JD ’07, began his career as an educator at Loyola High School in Los Angeles. He divided his time between breaking down equations at the head of a geometry classroom and inspiring students from the sidelines coaching the basketball and football teams. Despite the many rewards, Gray often found himself looking for more. ‘While I loved working with the students, I desired further intellectual challenge,’ Gray says. ‘I decided to pursue a law degree to gain the skills necessary to make a greater impact on society.'”

Read the full article here: [link]